PRP Joint Injections

PRP Joint injections are performed by a Certified Nurse Practitioner at Lifeways Rejuv Clinic.

Call for an appointment at 701-751-3271.

 What is Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Therapy?

PRP is a natural therapy using a patient’s own blood which contains high levels of platelets containing growth factors especially for acceleration in healing and regeneration.
PRP is plasma with many more platelets (typically 5-10 times greater or richer) than what is typically found in blood. The concentration of platelets also contains hundreds of proteins called growth factors which are critical in the healing of injuries.

 The Preparation

Blood is drawn in our office from the patient (just as in a routine blood draw). The platelets are separated from the other blood cells and their concentration is increased during a process called centrifugation. The increased concentration of platelets is combined with the remaining blood and injected into the desired location.

How Does PRP Work?

Laboratory studies have shown that the increased concentration of growth factors in PRP can potentially speed up the healing process. Individual results will vary but most people see results in 4 to 8 weeks depending upon the area/injury.

PRP is not a new concept. Over the past two decades, PRP therapy has been used to improve wound healing and bone grafting procedures in several areas including neurosurgery, urology, periodontal, cosmetic surgery, and head and neck surgery to name a few.

In recent years, PRP has gained prominence among sports medicine specialists, professional athletes, and increasingly among individuals engaged in recreational sports and overall healthy lifestyle.

On the rise in recent years, superstar athletes like Ray Lewis, Tiger Woods, Alex Rodriquez and Kobe Bryant are PRP fans.  Even a weekend warrior benefits from the technique of PRP injections to relieve pain and stop inflammation in many musculoskeletal disorders and sports injuries.

Sports Injuries and chronic pain including:

  • ACL Injuries
  • Ankle Sprains
  • Back and Neck Injuries
  • Chronic Plantar Fasciitis
  • Ligament Sprains
  • Meniscus Tears
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Tennis Elbow

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This